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One of the ways to get to know the local culture is to see the famous Bali dance. The tradition here is so colorful radiating from every corner of the island be it the beach or the lush greenery inland. It’s something you’ll witness in everyday life, in daily offerings, traditional crafts, clothing, etc. That’s what I loved about the island the most.

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Petals next to statues

Daily Offerings

Every morning you will come across small packed offerings on the beach, for instance, carefully placed down on the sand. Those are the so-called canang sari dedicated to the supreme Hindu god. The small baskets are crafted from palm leaves and typically filled with red, white, blue, and yellow flowers, along with aromatic incense when put outside homes and temples. Each component of the offering has a certain meaning.

There are tours in Bali that will take you through this in detail if you are interested. You will learn not only about the local rituals but participate in a short prayer, get a blessing, or have a consultation with a priest.

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Typical offerings in one of the temples

As for me, I was eager to know more about the culture. I was suggested to go and see the traditional Bali dance at Uluwatu Temple. Walking towards the temple gives you the idea of witnessing something spectacular.

The temple itself is a famous landmark. Situated in the south of the island (25 km south of Kuta), on the steep cliff about 70 meters above the sea, Uluwatu Temple, or the Pura Luhur Uluwatu is considered one of the key temples and Balinese spiritual pillars. (See the previous posts for more about the Mother Temple, Tanah Lot, and Ulun Danu Beratan temples.)

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Hungry monkeys on the wall

Bali Dance

Ulu means the top, watu – a stone or rock, hence the name of the temple “on the top of the rock”. It overlooks the Indian Ocean and the archaeological remains show that the temple dates back to the 10th century.

When strolling towards the temple, you will see hundreds of monkeys going in and out of the small forest. They are believed to guard the temple against bad influences and visitors often stop to feed them. (You can buy fruit at the entrance of the pathway.) Monkeys here are known for taking things from visitors. They will take your sunglasses, and pull your necklace or your hat down. So, it would be wiser just to give them something to eat.

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The gorgeous pathway toward Uluwatu

That walk along the fortified wall on the cliffside was one of the best sites I have seen on the island. I was walking down the pathway, glancing to the ocean on the right, giving fruit to small monkeys sitting on the wall, while the temple was peaking in front of me, on the steep cliff I was approaching. It takes about an hour to get from one gate to the other.

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Steep cliff emerging from the Indian Ocean

Kecak Dance

The temple is dedicated to the three divine powers of Brahma, Vishnu, and Siva who, according to belief, are united in one here. So, it celebrates the deity of all elements of life in the universe, but it is also believed to protect Bali from evil sea spirits. You should wear a sarong and a sash before entering the pathway. (I mentioned it in earlier posts.)

Just follow the path and you will get to the temple and its stage for the traditional Kecak Dance. It is performed every day with the sunset in the background. It’s such a surreal experience in such a surreal landscape!

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BALI DANCE: Mail choir in the Kecak Dance*

The Kecak Dance is a form of a Balinese music drama based on the Ramayana, the ancient Hindu epic illustrating the perpetual struggle between good and evil. It is performed mostly by a male choir, waving their hands and chanting “chak”. It’s done in a hypnotic beat to scare away evil spirits, depicting one of the Ramayana episodes.

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Interesting movements in the musical drama*

There is no public transport to Uluwatu Temple. The most convenient way to come would be to hire a driver or guide to get here in time for the performance.

Bali Dance

Kecak Dance finishes with a fire

Barong Dance

There is one more Bali dance I went to see. It was while visiting the town of Ubud, north of the Nusa Dua, in the Batubulan village. This was the Barong Dance, a piece of Balinese mythology with ornate costumes, traditional moves, and unique musical instruments. This dance depicts the conflict between the good Barong, dressed in a fanciful lion-like costume, and the evil Rangda.

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The temple’s tower

Many Balinese villages hold dance and music events as temple ceremonies. Some welcome tourists provided they discreetly observe and are dressed properly. You may also come across one-hour dance and music performances that take place in hotels and other settings, that are especially geared toward tourists. Even though they are not that authentic, you will still be able to get a glimpse of the local tradition and Bali dance.

Female dancer Bali

BALI DANCE: Fascinating costumes at the Barong Dance*

I was also mesmerized by the haunting percussion sounds of a gamelan traditional music and orchestra. The musicians play an assortment of instruments including native metal gongs, drums, chimes, cymbals, and xylophones.

And one more thing! They say that when you put the Barong mask on your door, it will prevent evil spirits from coming in. Oh, I just had to buy one!

Next: WHAT TO BUY (6)

The full Bali SERIES

*Pixabay

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Comments:

  • 21/03/2018

    Interesting notes you mentioned in the post. And the walk you did seems interesting, its always beautiful to see the off beaten tracks.

    reply...
    • 21/03/2018

      Hey!
      Well, to tell you the truth, this temple is not even close to the off beaten track. It’s actually extremely popular among visitors – the Uluwatu Temple. And you can see why, of course, the landscape is gorgeous! <3
      Thanks! 🙂

      reply...
      • 21/03/2018

        Not the temple I mean but the landscape as you walk into it. That’s the off beaten track. That’s how I see it as there are portions that you showed cultural aspects with many people

        reply...
  • 21/03/2018

    The cliffside walk must have offered a lovely view and it sounds like the monkeys have their own system to ensure that the people feed them. Nice post

    reply...
    • 21/03/2018

      Oh yes, they sure do. Interestingly enough, they do give back things they take if you give them food instead! 😀

      reply...
  • throughmypintglass

    21/03/2018

    I love your photos – they are seriously making me wish that I was in Bali. The cliffside walk actually reminds me a little bit of the landscape in Ireland.

    reply...
  • carrieemann

    21/03/2018

    So interesting to read about the traditions behind the dances. I went to a rendition of the Ramayana when I was in Ubud and found it fascinating — the costumes are incredible. I would’ve liked to see a couple other types of dance too but didn’t have time.

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    • 25/03/2018

      I know, the same here. I did what I had the time for. There’s always something left to do “next time”, right! 🙂

      reply...
  • 21/03/2018

    I absolutely love Bali and although I have been so many times, I have unbelievably never made it to Uluwatu! The rock face there is so beautiful. Maybe next time I’ll stay down that way and in Nusa Dua. I have seen the Kecak before in a temple In Ubud and its quite mesmerizing isn’t it?

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    • 25/03/2018

      Yep, it sure is, I just loved the Kecak dance. 🙂 Didn’t know you can see it in Ubud as well though. Good to know, thanks!

      reply...
  • 21/03/2018

    I lovvvve Bali so much!!! I’m also a huge fan of the arts and enjoy watching traditional dance performances. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to see any during my last visit. All the reason to go back!

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  • 21/03/2018

    This really does make me want to pack my bags and get to Bali. I’ve never been before!!

    reply...
  • Louise

    22/03/2018

    I remember going to Uluwatu Temple but unfortunately we did not get to watch any traditional dancing there. We were fortunate, however, to go to a Balinese wedding and see dancers there as well as at a traditional Balinese dinner 🙂 I loved watching them!
    Thanks for sharing the details behind the dances.

    reply...
  • Anna

    22/03/2018

    What a wonderful experience! I think it’s great that you’ve shared this because I’ve never known about it before, especially as you can’t reach it by public transport. I would love to see the dance one day.

    reply...
    • 25/03/2018

      When you get to Bali, try and make time for the Uluwatu Temple and the Kecak Dance. It’s really worth it. 🙂

      reply...

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